Tokyo MK Taxi Group Transfer Services: Taxi Fare

TAXI FARE Kanto Transportation Office Permission 2014/3/26

Fare Surcharge & Discount

*Discounts cannot be combined.
**Proof of age (over 65???) for seniors discount required.

  • It isn’t possible to do the use of the disabled person discount and the respect for the old discount.
  • As for the respect for the old discount, the show of the document that the age which the official facilities issues can be confirmed and so on becomes necessary.
  • There is an other time system fare, too.
  • As for the wireless allocation, a car for pick-up fee is taken.
  • ( Origin of the Kanto Land Transport Bureau guide )
  • The maximum allowed limit is 640 yen.
  • As for the wireless allocation, it doesn’t adopt the wireless wait fee but we wait for it at the fare where will be to the time after arrival ( being after the elapse from 5 minutes ) to ( 5 minutes when waiting ).
  • For details on flat fares to and from Narita and Haneda airports

Taxi Rate Calculator

This is a taxi fare simulation created using the Google Maps route search function.

Enter your point of departure, destination, and transit points to calculate the distance, time required, and Tokyo MK Taxi meter fare for your trip.

*Caution: The information displayed (route, distance, time required, and meter fare) is only an estimate, and cannot be guaranteed.

Coalition Against Insurance Fraud – Arsonist to insurers: Check fire claims more closely

kenny_allen_fire

Closer look deters arsonists, discovers scams, benefits all policyholders

Kenny Allen was a likable fellow. He went to church, coached youth basketball in the Muncie, Ind. area, and was making his way through life with limitless potential ahead.

He also lived in a secret world: He was an insurance thief. Kenny was a driving force behind the largest home arson ring in Indiana history. And one of the largest ever in the U.S. His gang helped torch at least 73 buildings while he sang hymns of righteousness in pews.

Insurers were easy to defraud, Allen says. Their adjusters were so intent on making customers happy — he contends — that they rarely asked tough questions. Insurers could’ve quickly exposed the claims for burned homes as money grabs with a little more effort.

Kenny went straight after nearly five years in federal prison. He admits he screwed up, and today gives workshops for investigators to help make amends. He partners with Mike Vergon, the former ATF agent who arrested him. They’re friends and supporters in life — a touching story of Kenny’s redemption.

Yet his saga speaks to a bigger dilemma for insurers. If they investigate too many claims too closely, they risk policyholders thinking they’re cold and money-grubbing.

If insurers let too many suspect claims slide through too easily, they risk being prey for hunters like Kenny was. This slippery slope can grow fraud losses, help raise premiums and — yes — reinforce a belief among many consumers that insurers are cold and money-grubbing.

Life isn’t always fair when you’re an insurance company, no matter how many good deeds you perform. Corporations are targets of consumer upset simply because they’re big and make money.

Checking closely into suspicious claims can trigger a lot of emotions. Fair or not, people’s feelings of aggrievement or entitlement can quickly damage an insurer’s reputation. Especially when viral social posts can reach millions of sympathetic consumers in just hours.

Over the longterm, it’s a risk worth taking, and a story worth telling.

Insurers should do a far better job of telling people why they fight fraud — and why all policyholders benefit.

Being justifiably known for protecting policyholders from thieves seems like a pretty good way to build a business brand. And doing right by consumers.

If Kenny Allen’s right, taking the easy way out could’ve cost insurers more than millions in false arson claims. He’s the first to admit, it’s a miracle nobody died in his fires.